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Wednesday, October 4, 2017

The Deadliest Mass Shootings and killings in U.S. His-story

Tarhaka Amaana El Bey

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In 1921 Greenwood in Tulsa Oklahoma had the wealthiest black neighborhood in the country. Well over 300 people were killed, About 40 blocks were destroyed, including 1,256 homes, many of which had been looted before they were set alight. The death toll, most likely never to be fully determined,

Rosewood Massacre (1923)

On January 1, 1923, a massacre was carried out in the small, predominantly black town of Rosewood in Central Florida. The massacre was instigated by the rumor that a white woman, Fanny Taylor, had been sexually assaulted by a black man in her home in a nearby community. A group of white men, believing this rapist to be a recently escaped convict named Jesse Hunter who was hiding in Rosewood,
Well over 150 people were murdered.

Thousands Of Free Black People Were Killed In Concentration Camps In The U.S?
The Devil’s Punchbowl is a place located in Natchez Mississippi, where during the Civil War, authorities forced tens of thousands of freed slaves to live in these American death camps. The Union army did not allow them to remove the bodies from the camp. They just gave ’em shovels and said bury ’em where they drop.”

“When the slaves were released from the plantations during the occupation they overran Natchez. And the population went from about 10,000 to 120,000 overnight,”.

“So they decided to build an encampment for ’em at Devil’s Punchbowl which they walled off and wouldn’t let ’em out,”

In Natchez Mississipi alone, official estimate that in the time span of just one year, over 20,000 free Black people were killed in the concentration camp called The Devil’s Punchbowl.

America’s Forgotten Mass Lynching: When 237 People Were Murdered In Elaine Arkansas.

A man named Carter had tended 90 acres of cotton, only to have his landlord seize the entire crop and his possessions. From the town of Ratio, in Phillips County, Arkansas, a black farmer reported that a plantation manager refused to give sharecroppers an itemized account for their crop. Another sharecropper told of a landlord trying “to starve the people into selling the cotton at his own price. They ain’t allowing us down their room to move our feet except to go to the field.”

No one could know it at the time, but within a year these inauspicious meetings would lead to one of the worst episodes of racial violence in U.S. history. Initiated by whites, the violence—by any measure, a massacre—claimed the lives of 237 African Americans, according to a just-released report from the Equal Justice Initiative. The death toll was unusually high, but the use of racial violence to subjugate blacks during this time was not uncommon.

The root cause of 1919’s violence was the reassertion of white supremacy after World War I. Disfranchisement, Jim Crow laws, and biased police forces and courts had stripped African Americans of many of their constitutional rights and created deeper economic, social, and political inequities. Blacks who defied the rules and traditions of white supremacy risked personal ruin (being banished from their hometowns was one punishment), bodily harm (beatings and whippings), and death.


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